BOOK’D| OSEMHEN AKHIBI

Osemhen Akhibi is a writer (and engineer) whose blog I started following when I first began blogging. I enjoy her storytelling and the way she shares her view of the world. Her natural hair is also, hashtag goals.

She’s obviously also a reader and in her interview she shares how she makes time for reading even with a toddler (and recently an additional newborn!) and why she doesn’t read all genres. Read to see which author she thinks is underrated and the book she dares you to read without crying! I’ve already gotten two books off this list for myself! Enjoy as Osemhen gets BOOK’D!


1. What are you currently reading? Do you usually read more than one book at a time?

If I’m reading more than one book at a time, it means one of them is boring. 🙂 I just finished The Shock of The Fall by Nathan Filer. About to start  A Man Called Ove. So you can say you’ve caught me in between books. Well, fiction that is. I haven’t started A Man Called Ove because I’m currently obsessed with a book called “Epidemic”. It’s non-fiction and it describes the relationship between permissive parenting and emotionally stunted children. It’s quite gripping.

If I’m reading more than one book at a time, it means one of them is boring. 🙂 - @OsemhenA Click To Tweet

2. Have you always been a reader? What is the first book you remember ever reading? What drew you into reading/why do you read?

There was a series called “Dear God” and it was essentially an illustrated series of letters by different children to God. I’ve always read. I don’t know why. Childhood boredom? Imagination? Nurturing by my parents?

3. What is your philosophy on reading?

129,864,880. That’s the number of books that have ever been written in the world. How many do you think you’ll read? About 8000, if you estimate that you read 2 books every week of your life and that you’ll live up to about age 80. That comes to 0.006% of all the books ever published. You’re not even counting repeat reads or considering that some of those books will be “forced” upon you as mandatory reading in school.

What’s the point of all this math? I decided that the books I do get to read are selected carefully. So, I read recommendations from good friends and authors I respect, I read award winners and books that make it onto shortlists. I don’t read genres I’m not interested in. No time!

I don’t read genres I’m not interested in. No time! - @OsemhenA Click To Tweet

4. How often do you read? And how do you fit it into your day?

I read 2 or 3 books per month. I read during lunch breaks and during my commute.

I read 2 or 3 books per month. I read during lunch breaks and during my commute. Click To Tweet

5. Where do you like to read? Where’s the weirdest place you’ve ever read a book?

There’s a faded yellow armchair in the corner of my sitting room. I do most of my reading there. Weirdest place? Never.

6. What makes a good book, in your opinion?

I might be paraphrasing something I’ve read somewhere but I think a good book should be both familiar and reveal something new about the human condition. I interpret that as “Does it make me think? Does it remind me of something long forgotten? Does it give me emotional deja vu?”

7. Who are your favorite authors to read?

Sefi Atta. Jodi Picoult. Igoni Barrett.

8. What is a book or who is an author you feel is very underrated?

Sefi Atta. I think she’s phenomenal but she’s so much less a celebrity than others.

9. E-book, audiobook or paper? How do you feel about making notes/highlighting books?

Paper, preferably 2nd hand as it’s cheaper.

E-book if I need to download it quickly and can’t wait. Audiobooks, never. I take notes, I highlight. Especially lines that I think are pretty and unique and I want to remember to quote somewhere.

10. Fiction vs Non-fiction?

Both.

11. What happens to you when you read a good book? (at the beginning, during and after the experience?)

I take it everywhere. To work. To parties. I read it standing in the elevator. That sort of thing.

12. Do you reread books? Why?

Many times, no. I have too many unread books, I see no reason to reread a book. Unless it’s poetry.

I have too many unread books, I see no reason to reread a book. Unless it’s poetry. Click To Tweet

13. What book do you wish you could experience again for the first time?

The Book Thief.

14. What was the last great book you read?

This interview has a lot of superlatives. Lol. I liked Taiye Selasi’s Ghana Must Go. I enjoyed it so much I sent my copy to my friend in Enugu so she could read it too. She was less impressed.

I liked Taiye Selasi’s Ghana Must Go. I enjoyed it so much I sent my copy to my friend in Enugu so she could read it too. Click To Tweet

15. If you had to choose three books that everyone should read, what would they be?

The Book Thief” for the beautiful prose, and the inevitable tears at the end. I dare you not to cry. “The Poisonwood Bible” for the beautiful prose. Colm Toibin’s “Brooklyn” for the story.

16. What book(s) are you embarrassed to have read? What books are you embarrassed to still not have read?

I haven’t read “Half Of A Yellow Sun” but I can carry out a decent conversation about it. Lol. I’m not embarrassed that I read so many Mills & Boon novels. I’m just regretful. See how I wasted time reading smut.

17. How do you feel about ‘classic’ literature?

I don’t kill myself. Some are nice. I like Hemingway, for instance. I’ve read Dickens and some original Shakespeare. But if I start a book and it’s terribly boring, I’ll drop it, classic or not. Remember, 8000 books in a lifetime. No time, no time.

if I start a book and it’s terribly boring, I’ll drop it, classic or not. Click To Tweet

18. How do you feel about book clubs?

I don’t know. They seem like a good idea but the few I’ve been in haven’t really worked for me.

19. What book(s) have changed your life, and how?

I’m struggling to pick a specific book. There are characters I’ve loved, who’ve inspired me. You could say my personality is an amalgamation of many of them. So maybe not so much “changed”, as “influenced”. Little Women. Pride & Prejudice. Strong women with a slight tomboyish bent.

20. How do you choose books to read?

Prestigious prize winners and their shortlists. Recommendations from friends. Amazon’s recommendations.

21. What book are you currently DYING to read?

Lol. Well, not exactly “dying” but I’m looking forward to reading “Elizabeth is Missing”.

Future reader 🙂

Osemhen AkhibiOsemhen is a lover of red sweaters and aspiring gardener and maintenance engineer and amateur baker. She blogs at eurekanaija and also runs blazersandbaby, a website for working mothers.

Connect with Osemhen Akhibi

Twitter: @OsemhenA

Instagram: @osemhene / @eurekanaija

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book’d is a weekly bookish interview series seeking to foster conversation on books and reading. Read our last interview with American Airlines engineer and non fiction buff, Temitope Akande.



  • 8000 books in a lifetime. Lol @ No time No time.
    Loved this one! I liked Jodi Picoult and should prob read more of Sefi Atta – read just one.

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