10 Books to read in 2017

2017 is still a long way from being over but the way the months are zooming past! There’s also been a ridiculous number of really good books and highly anticipated books in the press lately. This is basically a list of my highly anticipated + wishlist books thus far.

Stay With Me: I’m really looking forward to reading this debut novel by Ayobami Adebayo and with all the lovely covers I’ve seen so far I really want a hardcopy!

Blurb:

Yejide is hoping for a miracle, for a child. It is all her husband wants, all her mother-in-law wants, and she has tried everything – arduous pilgrimages, medical consultations, dances with prophets, appeals to God. But when her in-laws insist upon a new wife, it is too much for Yejide to bear. It will lead to jealousy, betrayal and despair.

Unravelling against the social and political turbulence of ’80s Nigeria, Stay with Me sings with the voices, colours, joys and fears of its surroundings. Ayobami Adebayo weaves a devastating story of the fragility of married love, the undoing of family, the wretchedness of grief and the all-consuming bonds of motherhood. It is a tale about our desperate attempts to save ourselves and those we love from heartbreak.

Exit WestMohsin Hamid is an author completely new to me but the blurb of his recent novel and all the praise really has me curious.

Blurb:

In a city swollen by refugees but still mostly at peace, or at least not yet openly at war, Saeed and Nadia share a cup of coffee, and their story begins. It will be a love story but also a story about war and a world in crisis, about how we live now and how we might live tomorrow. Before too long, the time will come for Nadia and Saeed to leave their homeland. When the streets are no longer useable and all options are exhausted, this young couple will join the great outpouring of those fleeing a collapsing city, hoping against hope, looking for their place in the world.

Hunger (out June 2017)Is a memoir of Roxane Gay’s body. Having read her book ‘An Untamed State’ a few years ago, I’m very stoked to read this book!

Blurb:

As a woman who describes her own body as “wildly undisciplined,” Roxane understands the tension between desire and denial, between self-comfort and self-care. In Hunger, she explores her past—including the devastating act of violence that acted as a turning point in her young life—and brings readers along on her journey to understand and ultimately save herself.

With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and power that have made her one of the most admired writers of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to learn to take care of yourself: how to feed your hungers for delicious and satisfying food, a smaller and safer body, and a body that can love and be loved—in a time when the bigger you are, the smaller your world becomes.

Little Deaths: 

Blurb: 

It’s the summer of 1965, and the streets of Queens, New York shimmer in a heatwave. One July morning, Ruth Malone wakes to find a bedroom window wide open and her two young children missing. After a desperate search, the police make a horrifying discovery.

Noting Ruth’s perfectly made-up face and provocative clothing, the empty liquor bottles and love letters that litter her apartment, the detectives leap to convenient conclusions, fuelled by neighbourhood gossip and speculation. Sent to cover the case on his first major assignment, tabloid reporter Pete Wonicke at first can’t help but do the same. But the longer he spends watching Ruth, the more he learns about the darker workings of the police and the press. Soon, Pete begins to doubt everything he thought he knew.

Ruth Malone is enthralling, challenging and secretive – is she really capable of murder?

The Mothers

Blurb: 

It is the last season of high school life for Nadia Turner, a rebellious, grief-stricken, seventeen-year-old beauty. Mourning her own mother’s recent suicide, she takes up with the local pastor’s son. Luke Sheppard is twenty-one, a former football star whose injury has reduced him to waiting tables at a diner. They are young; it’s not serious. But the pregnancy that results from this teen romance—and the subsequent cover-up—will have an impact that goes far beyond their youth. As Nadia hides her secret from everyone, including Aubrey, her God-fearing best friend, the years move quickly. Soon, Nadia, Luke, and Aubrey are full-fledged adults and still living in debt to the choices they made that one seaside summer, caught in a love triangle they must carefully maneuver, and dogged by the constant, nagging question: What if they had chosen differently? The possibilities of the road not taken are a relentless haunt.

The Ministry of Utmost HappinessI loved Arudhato Roy’s ‘the god of small things’ and if this book is anything like it, I’m thrilled by it already.

Blurb:​

In a graveyard outside the walls of Old Delhi, a resident unrolls a threadbare Persian carpet. On a concrete sidewalk, a baby suddenly appears, just after midnight. In a snowy valley, a bereaved father writes a letter to his five-year-old daughter about the people who came to her funeral. In a second-floor apartment, a lone woman chain-smokes as she reads through her old notebooks. At the Jannat Guest House, two people who have known each other all their lives sleep with their arms wrapped around each other, as though they have just met.
A braided narrative of astonishing force and originality, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness is at once a love story and a provocation—a novel as inventive as it is emotionally engaging. It is told with a whisper, in a shout, through joyous tears and sometimes with a bitter laugh. Its heroes, both present and departed, have been broken by the world we live in—and then mended by love. For this reason, they will never surrender.

Imagine Me Gone:

Blurb:

When Margaret’s fiancé, John, is hospitalized for depression in 1960s London, she faces a choice: carry on with their plans despite what she now knows of his condition, or back away from the suffering it may bring her. She decides to marry him. Imagine Me Gone is the unforgettable story of what unfolds from this act of love and faith. At the heart of it is their eldest son, Michael, a brilliant, anxious music fanatic who makes sense of the world through parody. Over the span of decades, his younger siblings — the savvy and responsible Celia and the ambitious and tightly controlled Alec — struggle along with their mother to care for Michael’s increasingly troubled and precarious existence.

Told in alternating points of view by all five members of the family, this searing, gut-wrenching, and yet frequently hilarious novel brings alive with remarkable depth and poignancy the love of a mother for her children, the often inescapable devotion siblings feel toward one another, and the legacy of a father’s pain in the life of a family.

Blood SistersMy Husband’s Wife , Jane Corry’s first novel, was a really good read and this one sounds interesting. Definitely looking out for it.

Blurb:

Two women. Two versions of the truth.

Kitty lives in a care home. She can’t speak properly, and she has no memory of the accident that put her here. At least that’s the story she’s sticking to.

Art teacher Alison looks fine on the surface. But the surface is a lie. When a job in a prison comes up she decides to take it – this is her chance to finally make things right.

But someone is watching Kitty and Alison.
Someone who wants revenge for what happened that sunny morning in May.

Little Fires Everywhere: I thoroughly enjoyed reading Celeste’s debut novel which I reviewed here, so I’m excited for this next one!

Blurb:

In Shaker Heights, a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, everything is planned – from the layout of the winding roads, to the colors of the houses, to the successful lives its residents will go on to lead. And no one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson, whose guiding principle is playing by the rules.

Enter Mia Warren – an enigmatic artist and single mother – who arrives in this idyllic bubble with her teenaged daughter Pearl, and rents a house from the Richardsons. Soon Mia and Pearl become more than tenants: all four Richardson children are drawn to the mother-daughter pair. But Mia carries with her a mysterious past and a disregard for the status quo that threatens to upend this carefully ordered community.

When old family friends of the Richardsons attempt to adopt a Chinese-American baby, a custody battle erupts that dramatically divides the town–and puts Mia and Elena on opposing sides.  Suspicious of Mia and her motives, Elena is determined to uncover the secrets in Mia’s past. But her obsession will come at unexpected and devastating costs. 

Like Mule Bringing Ice Cream to the SunThe cover of this book is absolutely delightful! And the plot seems so different from anything I’ve read from a Nigerian author.

Blurb:

Morayo Da Silva, a cosmopolitan Nigerian woman, lives in hip San Francisco. On the cusp of seventy-five, she is in good health and makes the most of it, enjoying road trips in her vintage Porsche, chatting to strangers, and recollecting characters from her favourite novels. Then she has a fall and her independence crumbles. Without the support of family, she relies on friends and chance encounters. As Morayo recounts her story, moving seamlessly between past and present, we meet Dawud, a charming Palestinian shopkeeper, Sage, a feisty, homeless Grateful Dead devotee, and Antonio, the poet whom Morayo desired more than her ambassador husband.

I’m obviously also reading many books not on this list, including Charlie and the Chocolate Factory! (which is sweet!). I wish I could simply sit and read allll day but life and priorities eh?

What are you reading? What are you looking forward to reading? Please share! There’s no such thing as too many book recommendations!

Afoma x

** Blurbs quoted from amazon.com.

 



  • Obinna Augustine

    Interesting, I look forward to reading some of the books on the list. However, I’m currently reading a book- Mere Christianity by Lewis, C.S. it’s an amazing book that has done wonders for my Faith as a Christian. Reading it at this point in my life makes it just…perfect. You can check that out.Thanks for sharing!

  • Obinna Augustine

    Oh, and I’m looking forward to reading Jane Corry’s My Husband’s Wife. Your recommendation in an earlier blog post got me excited. And it sounds just like the kind of book I’d read.

    • It’s a really good book! Thanks for sharing what you’re reading! 🙂

  • Tofunmi Awodein

    Currently reading Veronica decides to die looking forward to Efuru 😉

    • I’ll check out Veronica decides to die! I hope you enjoy Efuru 🙂

  • AB x MeeMee

    Like a Mule Bringing Ice-Cream to the Sun was the last book I read. Short & sweet. I wish there was more. Currently reading not particularly interesting How-To self-help pdfs. Fun times.

    • I saw when you bought it! I’m halfway through and enjoying it a great deal! aww, i hope you get to read something fun soon! x

  • Frances I

    Hi Afoma!

    I have been TRYING to post this comment for days! I nominated you for the Blogger Recognition Award. Please find the link here – https://omasserendipity.wordpress.com/2017/04/14/my-blogger-recognition-award/

    Looking forward to your post on it! 🙂

    Ihuoma.

    • Thank you! Will check it out 🙂

  • Debby000

    Interested in reading the mothers,hunger and exit west.
    You didn’t put up the author of “the mothers”

    • Great choices! Brit Bennett is the author. Didn’t put up the authors of quite a few of them, thats why they’re linked so you can go straight to the amazon page for more info 🙂